heidi: (legally)
Crossposted from Tumblr.

Amazon is working with WB to publish (read: sell) fanfiction from the Gossip Girl, Pretty Little Liars and Vampire Diaries 'verses. And they said that more "worlds" will be announced soon. 


Basically, fanfic writers will be able to sell their fics - formatted for Kindle - via Amazon, and the restrictions are not as massive as you'd think!


No crossovers. 


No excessive product placement for non-show brands. 


No porn


But here's the thing about porn! Amazon says they don't allow porn to be sold on their site, so as long as your fic content is no more explicit than anything that's on Amazon's site today (see: 50 Shades and anything in the erotica category) then it won't run afoul of Amazon's content restrictions - and if they say it does, then the Internet will stand behind you as if you were a Nutella fan barred from celebrating its wonderful tastiness. 


HOWEVER, each World Licensor will be providing "Content Guidelines" for their specific 'verse - and I can't find those anywhere. THAT might make a significant impact on what types of fanfic one can and cannot sell, but until we've had a chance to look through them, we can't determine the specifics. 


I don't think it's realistic to be concerned that the existence of Kindle Worlds will mean that tv show/film/book creators will stamp out freely given fics. At this point, Kindle Worlds will only accept things over 5000 words, anyway, and the longstanding laches issue that protects fics posted elsewhere and given away will still hold. 


However, it does mean that people who write in the fandoms covered by Kindle Worlds and sell ebooks of those stories outside of the Kindle license may find themselves dealing with cease & desist letters. But there was always a chance they would because of the commercial aspect of that action. 


Also, this will leave fandom with a lot of questions on issues other than legality be on fan-created gift culture, commissions, fundraising for charity, or even the ability of pro writers to write in other universes> 


Does this further "legitimize" fan creativity (which I think has long been a pretty legit hobby), will it just create an additional outlet for story distribution, and what other fandoms will WB add? 


I wouldn't be shocked if they bring Tomorrow People into this as the show launches in the fall, but what about things that are ending their runs like Nikita, or shows with massive fanbases and almost a decade of fan creativity, like the behemoth that is Supernatural?


Oh, and here't the royalty-related info: 




  • Amazon Publishing will pay royalties to the rights holder for the World (we call them World Licensors) and to the Fic Author. Fic Author's standard royalty rate for works of at least 10,000 words will be 35% of net revenue.

  • In addition, with the launch of Kindle Worlds, Amazon Publishing will pilot an experimental new program for particularly short works (between 5,000 and 10,000 words). For these short stories—typically priced under one dollar—Amazon will pay the royalties for the World Licensor and will pay authors a digital royalty of 20% of net revenue. The lower royalty for these shorter works is due to significantly higher fixed costs per digital copy (for example, credit-card fees) when prices for the entire class of content will likely be under one dollar.




Now, I want to be very clear - I think the possible impacts of this are serious and significant and will change fandom massively - but I'm not sure that it gives any rightsholders any additional rights/chances/ability to go after anyone who's giving their fic away for free - at least not in the US, under current IP law.
heidi: (legally)
Crossposted from Tumblr.

Amazon is working with WB to publish (read: sell) fanfiction from the Gossip Girl, Pretty Little Liars and Vampire Diaries 'verses. And they said that more "worlds" will be announced soon. 


Basically, fanfic writers will be able to sell their fics - formatted for Kindle - via Amazon, and the restrictions are not as massive as you'd think!


No crossovers. 


No excessive product placement for non-show brands. 


No porn


But here's the thing about porn! Amazon says they don't allow porn to be sold on their site, so as long as your fic content is no more explicit than anything that's on Amazon's site today (see: 50 Shades and anything in the erotica category) then it won't run afoul of Amazon's content restrictions - and if they say it does, then the Internet will stand behind you as if you were a Nutella fan barred from celebrating its wonderful tastiness. 


HOWEVER, each World Licensor will be providing "Content Guidelines" for their specific 'verse - and I can't find those anywhere. THAT might make a significant impact on what types of fanfic one can and cannot sell, but until we've had a chance to look through them, we can't determine the specifics. 


I don't think it's realistic to be concerned that the existence of Kindle Worlds will mean that tv show/film/book creators will stamp out freely given fics. At this point, Kindle Worlds will only accept things over 5000 words, anyway, and the longstanding laches issue that protects fics posted elsewhere and given away will still hold. 


However, it does mean that people who write in the fandoms covered by Kindle Worlds and sell ebooks of those stories outside of the Kindle license may find themselves dealing with cease & desist letters. But there was always a chance they would because of the commercial aspect of that action. 


Also, this will leave fandom with a lot of questions on issues other than legality be on fan-created gift culture, commissions, fundraising for charity, or even the ability of pro writers to write in other universes> 


Does this further "legitimize" fan creativity (which I think has long been a pretty legit hobby), will it just create an additional outlet for story distribution, and what other fandoms will WB add? 


I wouldn't be shocked if they bring Tomorrow People into this as the show launches in the fall, but what about things that are ending their runs like Nikita, or shows with massive fanbases and almost a decade of fan creativity, like the behemoth that is Supernatural?


Oh, and here't the royalty-related info: 




  • Amazon Publishing will pay royalties to the rights holder for the World (we call them World Licensors) and to the Fic Author. Fic Author's standard royalty rate for works of at least 10,000 words will be 35% of net revenue.

  • In addition, with the launch of Kindle Worlds, Amazon Publishing will pilot an experimental new program for particularly short works (between 5,000 and 10,000 words). For these short stories—typically priced under one dollar—Amazon will pay the royalties for the World Licensor and will pay authors a digital royalty of 20% of net revenue. The lower royalty for these shorter works is due to significantly higher fixed costs per digital copy (for example, credit-card fees) when prices for the entire class of content will likely be under one dollar.


heidi: (Yuletide01)
I got to write a Political Animals fic for [profile] tascioni, who asked for a fic in which TJ was happy, which let me mentally revisit Washington DC & Kramerbooks over the holidays, throw some Love Actually into the mix and title it with a line from the Panic! At the Disco/fun. song C'Mon, which is the TJ and/or Jack Benjamin Song of my Heart.

It's technically mature (Yes! I wrote shagging!!) and there's Thomas "T.J." Hammond/Sean Reeves, and you can find it here

What Would My Head Be Like?
heidi: (Fair Use)
re: your dismissal of fan-created works, which was weird, dismissive of Pulitzer prize winning works and other classics, and most frustrating to me, inaccurate regarding the legal issues (although, of course, what you feel is ethical or not is a decision that is entirely your call)

I have a question.

Spoilers for last night's Chuck and a few other shows which have aired in the last two or three years )

I really want to address the discussion of [livejournal.com profile] help_haiti, but I am having a hard time doing so without crying. People - not just fanfic writers and fanartists and vidders and iconers but novelists and musicians from around the world - got together to do something positive to help people in need.

I was involved in both [livejournal.com profile] help_haiti and Helping Haiti Heal - both were grass-roots projects and collectively, they raised about a quarter of a million dollars which went to Partners in Health, UNICEF, the Red Cross, Red Crescent, Yele and over a dozen more organizations. We sent five-plus planes full of supplies to Haiti this spring because of fannish efforts.

And both projects included thank-yous from fan-creators and notable authors. For example, Helping Haiti Heal's thank-yous included wizard rock memorabilia, and a signed set of Harry Potter books donated by JKR. It included fanart, and signed books from Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. Naomi Novik donated the ability to name a character in an upcoming book of hers, and Melissa Anelli personalized copies of her book about the Harry Potter fandom.

Fans and creators came together to do something wonderful, and it helped lives.

Now, how is that like seduction of someone's husband (and, btw, doesn't it take two to tango? Nobody cheats unless they want to.) or for (oh my God I cannot believe this comparison) hell's sake how is that like rape or even taking flowers from a garden?

No, no author has to be as understanding of her fans' urge to create stories or art or vids based on her works as JK Rowling has been.

But I can think of at least a dozen women who, in the last decade, have written (or beta read) Harry Potter fanfic and gone on to publishing contracts and best-sellers and sales of the movie rights to their books - and I know a dozen more who're going to reach that milestone in the next year or two. Yes, people would still be writing Harry Potter fanfic even if JKR wasn't relatively okay with it, because it would still be transformative and fair use and since fair use is a lawful use of copyright...

And that's a good thing.

Oh, and I have one last question for Ms Gabaldon.

When people make icons that include bits of your book covers, how do you feel about that? Because I am really kind of curious...
heidi: (Fair Use)
re: your dismissal of fan-created works, which was weird, dismissive of Pulitzer prize winning works and other classics, and most frustrating to me, inaccurate regarding the legal issues (although, of course, what you feel is ethical or not is a decision that is entirely your call)

I have a question.

Spoilers for last night's Chuck and a few other shows which have aired in the last two or three years )

I really want to address the discussion of [livejournal.com profile] help_haiti, but I am having a hard time doing so without crying. People - not just fanfic writers and fanartists and vidders and iconers but novelists and musicians from around the world - got together to do something positive to help people in need.

I was involved in both [livejournal.com profile] help_haiti and Helping Haiti Heal - both were grass-roots projects and collectively, they raised about a quarter of a million dollars which went to Partners in Health, UNICEF, the Red Cross, Red Crescent, Yele and over a dozen more organizations. We sent five-plus planes full of supplies to Haiti this spring because of fannish efforts.

And both projects included thank-yous from fan-creators and notable authors. For example, Helping Haiti Heal's thank-yous included wizard rock memorabilia, and a signed set of Harry Potter books donated by JKR. It included fanart, and signed books from Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. Naomi Novik donated the ability to name a character in an upcoming book of hers, and Melissa Anelli personalized copies of her book about the Harry Potter fandom.

Fans and creators came together to do something wonderful, and it helped lives.

Now, how is that like seduction of someone's husband (and, btw, doesn't it take two to tango? Nobody cheats unless they want to.) or for (oh my God I cannot believe this comparison) hell's sake how is that like rape or even taking flowers from a garden?

No, no author has to be as understanding of her fans' urge to create stories or art or vids based on her works as JK Rowling has been.

But I can think of at least a dozen women who, in the last decade, have written (or beta read) Harry Potter fanfic and gone on to publishing contracts and best-sellers and sales of the movie rights to their books - and I know a dozen more who're going to reach that milestone in the next year or two. Yes, people would still be writing Harry Potter fanfic even if JKR wasn't relatively okay with it, because it would still be transformative and fair use and since fair use is a lawful use of copyright...

And that's a good thing.

Oh, and I have one last question for Ms Gabaldon.

When people make icons that include bits of your book covers, how do you feel about that? Because I am really kind of curious...
heidi: (Fair Use)
Thank you for doing so, New York Magazine (Nov. 30, 2009 issue).

That is, in case it wasn't fully mainstreamed before.

Also, I know I am going to sound rather control-ish here, but after this moment, I think the issue of "Is RPF Legal When Those Incorporated Into the Story Are Public Figures" is completely and totally moot. The lawyersn for New York Media LLC are fine with it.

New York is currently hosting the following:

1. Seven stories written by well-recognized writers that are, for all intents and purposes, political RPF. In fact, the cover blurb on the Nov. 30 issue includes "Sarah Lusts for Levi by Paul Rudnick". Paul Rudnkick. Who wrote Jeffrey, In & Out (fictionalized Ton Hanks-inspired RPF), Stepford Wives (that 2004 version) and more. Mary Gaitskill, who wrote the story on which Secretary is based, wrote about a meeting between Ashley Dupre and Silda Spitzer. Walter Kirn (the writer of the book on which Up In the Air is based) wrote about Mitt Romney. And there's stories about Barack Obama having a midnight meeting, George and Babs Bush dealing with a dog, etc.

2. A contest where readers are invited to submit their own "political fictions".
We want you to write your own short stories—or movie treatments, or mini one-act plays—starring political figures. Shoot for around 1,000 words, but we’re flexible. E-mail to politicalfictions@nymag.com.


Oh come on! Some of you have things on your hard drives (or livejournals) already that you should enter into this contest! You can win a trip to DC!

New York even has some ideas for you!
To help you get in the right frame of mind, here are some suggestions for scenarios you might consider. You don’t have to use these, but they’re the kind of thing we’re looking for: date night with the Obamas; Bill Clinton dispenses fatherly advice to Levi Johnston; Reggie Love’s day off; John and Meghan McCain discuss her Twitter cleavage shot; Michelle Obama and Sarah Palin go to a sample sale together; Rudy Giuliani, Mike Huckabee, and Mitch Romney plot how to take down Sarah Palin; Joe Biden has a frank conversation with himself; Rudy Giuliani visits Bernie Kerik in prison; Nancy Pelosi and Barney Frank gossip over cosmopolitans; Matt Drudge and Andrew Sullivan go on a date.


New York clearly thinks it's legal to do this - it's not defamation, they find it clever or unique or amusing and perhaps they completely missed the sudden outpouring of Rahm-centric fic almost exactly a year ago?

No, RPF and RPS are not of interest to everyone, and there have always been films and books and songs that are about real people (live or dead) in fictionalized situations (at least three different Beatles ones come to mind) so this isn't really such a fantastically new and unheard of occurrence, but it is notable - and hey, if one of you wins, I'd love to get a postcard from Washington DC.

The deadline for entries is December 7. Huh. Is it ok for someone to submit a [livejournal.com profile] yuletide fic?

ETA: For another perspective, check out Medievalists - We Go There.
heidi: (Fair Use)
Thank you for doing so, New York Magazine (Nov. 30, 2009 issue).

That is, in case it wasn't fully mainstreamed before.

Also, I know I am going to sound rather control-ish here, but after this moment, I think the issue of "Is RPF Legal When Those Incorporated Into the Story Are Public Figures" is completely and totally moot. The lawyersn for New York Media LLC are fine with it.

New York is currently hosting the following:

1. Seven stories written by well-recognized writers that are, for all intents and purposes, political RPF. In fact, the cover blurb on the Nov. 30 issue includes "Sarah Lusts for Levi by Paul Rudnick". Paul Rudnkick. Who wrote Jeffrey, In & Out (fictionalized Ton Hanks-inspired RPF), Stepford Wives (that 2004 version) and more. Mary Gaitskill, who wrote the story on which Secretary is based, wrote about a meeting between Ashley Dupre and Silda Spitzer. Walter Kirn (the writer of the book on which Up In the Air is based) wrote about Mitt Romney. And there's stories about Barack Obama having a midnight meeting, George and Babs Bush dealing with a dog, etc.

2. A contest where readers are invited to submit their own "political fictions".
We want you to write your own short stories—or movie treatments, or mini one-act plays—starring political figures. Shoot for around 1,000 words, but we’re flexible. E-mail to politicalfictions@nymag.com.


Oh come on! Some of you have things on your hard drives (or livejournals) already that you should enter into this contest! You can win a trip to DC!

New York even has some ideas for you!
To help you get in the right frame of mind, here are some suggestions for scenarios you might consider. You don’t have to use these, but they’re the kind of thing we’re looking for: date night with the Obamas; Bill Clinton dispenses fatherly advice to Levi Johnston; Reggie Love’s day off; John and Meghan McCain discuss her Twitter cleavage shot; Michelle Obama and Sarah Palin go to a sample sale together; Rudy Giuliani, Mike Huckabee, and Mitch Romney plot how to take down Sarah Palin; Joe Biden has a frank conversation with himself; Rudy Giuliani visits Bernie Kerik in prison; Nancy Pelosi and Barney Frank gossip over cosmopolitans; Matt Drudge and Andrew Sullivan go on a date.


New York clearly thinks it's legal to do this - it's not defamation, they find it clever or unique or amusing and perhaps they completely missed the sudden outpouring of Rahm-centric fic almost exactly a year ago?

No, RPF and RPS are not of interest to everyone, and there have always been films and books and songs that are about real people (live or dead) in fictionalized situations (at least three different Beatles ones come to mind) so this isn't really such a fantastically new and unheard of occurrence, but it is notable - and hey, if one of you wins, I'd love to get a postcard from Washington DC.

The deadline for entries is December 7. Huh. Is it ok for someone to submit a [livejournal.com profile] yuletide fic?

ETA: For another perspective, check out Medievalists - We Go There.
heidi: (Fair Use)
Thank you for doing so, New York Magazine (Nov. 30, 2009 issue).

That is, in case it wasn't fully mainstreamed before.

Also, I know I am going to sound rather control-ish here, but after this moment, I think the issue of "Is RPF Legal When Those Incorporated Into the Story Are Public Figures" is completely and totally moot. The lawyersn for New York Media LLC are fine with it.

New York is currently hosting the following:

1. Seven stories written by well-recognized writers that are, for all intents and purposes, political RPF. In fact, the cover blurb on the Nov. 30 issue includes "Sarah Lusts for Levi by Paul Rudnick". Paul Rudnkick. Who wrote Jeffrey, In & Out (fictionalized Ton Hanks-inspired RPF), Stepford Wives (that 2004 version) and more. Mary Gaitskill, who wrote the story on which Secretary is based, wrote about a meeting between Ashley Dupre and Silda Spitzer. Walter Kirn (the writer of the book on which Up In the Air is based) wrote about Mitt Romney. And there's stories about Barack Obama having a midnight meeting, George and Babs Bush dealing with a dog, etc.

2. A contest where readers are invited to submit their own "political fictions".
We want you to write your own short stories—or movie treatments, or mini one-act plays—starring political figures. Shoot for around 1,000 words, but we’re flexible. E-mail to politicalfictions@nymag.com.


Oh come on! Some of you have things on your hard drives (or livejournals) already that you should enter into this contest! You can win a trip to DC!

New York even has some ideas for you!
To help you get in the right frame of mind, here are some suggestions for scenarios you might consider. You don’t have to use these, but they’re the kind of thing we’re looking for: date night with the Obamas; Bill Clinton dispenses fatherly advice to Levi Johnston; Reggie Love’s day off; John and Meghan McCain discuss her Twitter cleavage shot; Michelle Obama and Sarah Palin go to a sample sale together; Rudy Giuliani, Mike Huckabee, and Mitch Romney plot how to take down Sarah Palin; Joe Biden has a frank conversation with himself; Rudy Giuliani visits Bernie Kerik in prison; Nancy Pelosi and Barney Frank gossip over cosmopolitans; Matt Drudge and Andrew Sullivan go on a date.


New York clearly thinks it's legal to do this - it's not defamation, they find it clever or unique or amusing and perhaps they completely missed the sudden outpouring of Rahm-centric fic almost exactly a year ago?

No, RPF and RPS are not of interest to everyone, and there have always been films and books and songs that are about real people (live or dead) in fictionalized situations (at least three different Beatles ones come to mind) so this isn't really such a fantastically new and unheard of occurrence, but it is notable - and hey, if one of you wins, I'd love to get a postcard from Washington DC.

The deadline for entries is December 7. Huh. Is it ok for someone to submit a [community profile] yuletide fic?
heidi: (Canon spinning)
To celebrate the births of [livejournal.com profile] mctabby's cats, she hosts an annual drabble-a-thon, and this year, I decided to participate, because last year I was busy recouperating from a post-birth headache and thus was quite miserable. This year, I plotted it out on the beach while watching my daughter play in the sand, so what was supposed to be 100 words turned into about 1100 words - meep, that's what happens when you don't write at all in over a year! - so I've posted it here behind the cut )

Oh, and [livejournal.com profile] sharp_tongue wrote a wonderful ficlet for me! Thanks so much for it!
heidi: (JustMyType)
It's been over five years since the first Harry Potter fanfiction
started to make its way online, and now, estimates show that there are
over two hundred thousand stories by thousands of authors of all ages
- some are the same age as Hogwarts students, while others are peers
of Minerva McGonagall.

Of course, with that many stories online, finding the good ones is
about as difficult as picking the correct door in the Department of
the Mysteries. Luckily, sites, blogs and communities cater to linking
readers with wonderful stories, which is a necessity now that the
larger fanfic sites can add a thousand new fics in a week.

FictionAlley has a collection of databases and search engines where
authors can post links to their fics, sorted by pairing, character,
era, location and language
(http://www.fictionalley.org//fictionalleypark/) ; other communities,
sites and Yahoogroups cater to readers who have more specific
intentions in searching for fics. For example, those who enjoy reading
and writing very short fics can take the weekly challenge at HP100
(http://www.livejournal.com/community/hp100/), where every Saturday,
the mods post a topic and over the course of the next seven days,
people post 100 word stories (also known as "drabbles") to the
community. HP Challenge
(http://www.livejournal.com/community/hpchallenges/) is a similarly
themed community, although without the word limit. Those who are
searching specifically for fics that delve into what happened to
Sirius after OotP read and post at 806Fiction
(http://www.livejournal.com/community/806fiction/) and others
concentrate on the wizarding world before Harry Potter's birth - and
even before his parents, James and Lily, attended Hogwarts, at
PotterPast, a community dedicated fanworks based on previous eras and
characters hinted at in the books.

In the time since the release of Order of the Phoenix, fanficcers have
tried to explore the impact of that book on the characters that we
thought we knew. NotMollyWeasley explores Percy Weasley, and imagines
a relationship between the former Head Boy and Gryffindor Prefect
Hermione Granger through the years, including those after she
graduates from Hogwarts
(http://www.astronomytower.org/authors/notmollyweasley). Madame
Pomfrey considers Remus Lupin in Alkari's A Most Unusual Student
(http://www.sugarquill.net/read.php?storyid=482&chapno=1). Eslyssa's
Lost On The Border of Twilight (http://
http//www.schnoogle.com/authors/eslyssa/LOBAT01.html) explores some of
Severus Snape's past, and how his interactions with James Potter & Co.
bent the path he thought himself on.

Since there were three years between the release of Goblet of Fire and
Order of the Phoenix, many authors had the time to develop Rowling's
world in ways she probably never imagined , but with only eighteen
months between the release of book five and the announcement of book
six, it is more of a challenge to create a story that is a fully
developed alternative to The Half-Blood Prince - but some authors are
happy to take on the challenge! Myth and Legend's The Shadows of
Silence shows Harry living with the aftermath of deaths and sadness,
searching for honour in a more treacherous world than he'd previously
imagined (http://www.schnoogle.com/authors/malegend/SS01.html), and
Bored Beyond Belief's All That's Left Behind traces Harry through his
sixteenth summer and his sixth year at Hogwarts
(http://www.fanfiction.net/s/2194367/1/). Edallia Monotheer's
Legacy's Fall finds Harry roused from complete inactivity by a request
for help from the most unlikely person in the world. After a tense
summer, Draco Malfoy's gotten himself into enough trouble to have to
request the help. Meanwhile, Ginny is restless and volatile, Narcissa
is the world's most useless spy, and Remus Lupin has to shepherd
everyone on a cross-country chase from someone hellbent on revenge,
while Draco and Harry, thrust into close circumstance, learn how not
to kill each other.(http://www.schnoogle.com/authorLinks/Edallia_Monotheer/Legacys_Fall/).

RobinLady takes a different route with Promises Unbroken, which takes
place in an alternative universe where Sirius was the Potters' secret
keeper, and where James and Lily live, Harry attends Hogwarts, and
Voldemort remains in a darker world where nothing is as it seems
(http://www.thedarkarts.org/authors/robinlady/PUpro.html).

But the Potter-verse is not all gloom and sorrow - Azriona's Hogwarts
Musicals turn Broadway shows like The Sound of Music, Grease and Rent
into spot-on character explorations, and she does it with a touch of
humor, too! (http://www.riddikulus.org/authorLinks/Azriona/) Sam
Vimes' exploration of the process of registration at Hogwarts in the
summer of 1980 is the plot behind Registration
(http://www.riddikulus.org/authors/samvimes/registration.html) but the
story itself showcases the parents of the students we know well, which
resonates with the historical lessons of Order of the Phoenix.

Luna Lovegood has proven to be one of the most written-about new
characters, and Tonks is a close second. Michelle 31a's The Dark Lord
That Stole Christmas finds Voldemort consulting his Evil Overlord
handbook and decides to rid Hogwarts of some Christmas cheer...until
he gets discovered sneaking around the Ravenclaw common room
(http://www.riddikulus.org/authors/michelle_31a/DLTSC.html), and Lady
Draherm's The First Social Outing finds Luna and Ron on a date in
Hogsmeade (http://www.astronomytower.org/authorLinks/Lady_Draherm/First_Social_Outing/).
In FernWithy's The Doll Army
(http://www.sugarquill.net/read.php?storyid=1425&chapno=1) year old
Dora Tonks gets a visit from three Marauders, and her dolls get a new
mission; Pandora Culpa's Between The Bars
(http://www.astronomytower.org/authors/pculpa/BB.html) explores what
happens the first time anyone other than the Marauders cares enough to
spend a full moon night with Remus Lupin.

While some writers enjoy re-examining the same pairing or the same
characters over and over again, others find an exciting challenge in
pushing the envelope - and nowhere is that done more comprehensively
than in the Shoebox Project
(http://www.livejournal.com/community/shoebox_project/), a
collaboration between Rave and Jaida. The project includes both fanfic
and fanart, as if the reader was digging through Remus Lupin's shoebox
of memories, and discovering notes, sketches, drafts of the Marauder's
Map and other bits and bobbins from the not-so-distant past.

Over the years, many fanfic readers have also become fanfic writers,
when they find themselves inspired by something about the Harry Potter
books and decide to explore that idea in a narrative form. After
putting the story on paper, some writers just upload the fic and hope
that people enjoy it - but that's not how real writers, like JK
Rowling, turn their imaginative works into books. Ms Rowling works
with a team of editors at Bloomsbury and Scholastic - they make
editorial suggestions and polish the books into the form we put on our
shelves. Beta readers fill a similar role in the fanfiction universe;
a beta reads a story before it is posted online and makes sure that
the grammar and spelling are top-notch, reminds the author of any gaps
between the fanfic and events from the books (the "canon"), and even
makes suggestions about characterization and plot. PerfectImagination
(http://www.perfectimagination.co.uk/) and FictionAlley's Lumos
Dissendium ("http://www.lumosdissendium.org) have beta reader
exchanges and services (although FictionAlley doesn't require authors
to use a beta reader), while sites like Sugarquill
(http://www.sugarquill.net) require all new authors to use one of
their official beta readers.

Some writers enjoy workshopping their fics; Dr. Catherine M.
Schaff-Stump, a creative writing teacher and founder of several online
writing workshops, used YahooGroups as a way for writers to upload
stories, exchange comments and critique each other's stories.
TapestMLP's Eshu's Daughter
(http://www.sugarquill.net/read.php?storyid=1589&chapno=1) and Jiminy
C's Moondance (http://www.sugarquill.net/read.php?storyid=1626&chapno=1)
both benefited from their authors' participation in one such workshop.

In the weeks since the JK Rowling's announcement of the July release
of Half-Blood Prince, writers have been scurrying to wrap up their
theorizing and storytelling before the release of the book throws all
of us into loops with new information, new characters and new
speculation. But there's still more than enough time to catch up on
the stories you might've missed, or even start - and, if you like,
finish - writing a story or two before July 16. And if you don't
manage to finish it in time, do what the best Sirius-Isn't-Dead
theorists have done these past two years - regardless of what happens
in The Half-Blood Prince, you can enjoy it anyway.
heidi: (JustMyType)
The Spring 2005 issue of Movie Magic Magazine has just hit newsstands with about 40 pages of stories on Harry Potter, with a focus on Book Six, Movie Four and various fandom projects as well (thanks to Jenna at DanRadcliffe.com for the Table of Contents scan). The issue includes my follow-up to last year's article about fanfiction (I'll be able to post the original article in July - it was edited a bit, and some things were tweaked from the way I originally wrote it, as happened last time, but that's showbiz journalism, as well as a story about fan films, including Potter Puppet Pals, and a focus on some popular fandom websites including TLC and I think they also mention The Lexicon. [livejournal.com profile] ladyjaida has a snip of the fanfic article here and I'm going to see if I can at least post the whole list here on my LJ...

Enjoy!



(Oh, and PS - last year there was some wank along the lines of OMG TPTB will know about fanfic from this article! Eeeeek! and some less panicky "will this impact JKR's take on fanfic?" posts as well. Hopefully, that won't happen again, because, well, nothing negative happened because of last year's article, did it? Is everyone more relaxed this year? Please?)
heidi: (meh)
On the Zendom multifandom list, there's a discussion of warnings, and it's been brought up that there are fandoms and lists where authors have to provide warnings for all things that happen in the fic which might disturb a reader. As I pulled from one fansite, "This is where you post the reason for your story's rating and list anything that you think could potentially offend or disturb readers - violence, implied sex, strong language, etc..."

So, to help the fandom, I have created a warning for Goblet of Fire. I know I'm missing some important plot points, but at least it's a start.


Deaths of one character in the same chapter in which he first appears, death of an underage character at unexpected moment, described murder of adult character by his son, many het pairings at dance and other school activities, at least three het adult pairings, one pairing involving a gender-unspecific character dancing with a character who has only one leg and an eye that can see through clothing (both injuries occurred in backstory), one naked underage character in bathtub being watched by underage ghost, one adult character steps naked from a large cauldron and is robed by another male character, one character engages in self-mutilation in manner which might be similar to cutting, multiple transformations of characters into animals, including one noncon transformation which includes underage character being bounced from floor to ceiling, one scene takes place in graveyard, underage character is tied to tombstone and subjected to bloodletting, underage character and other character battle with wands, a spider is killed, four characters are made unconscious and tied to a rock under a lake, one character makes possibly sexually harrassing joke about "Uranus", one het hug and various het kisses, verbal and physical assaults via mail on female character, imprisonment of antagonist character in beetle form, hero and friends cause three underage characters to become unconscious, much consumption of sweets and nonalcoholic drinks, some alcoholic beverages mentioned and consumed (off page) by horses, consumption of slightly alcoholic beverages by nonhuman character to the point of drunkenness, noncon levitation of minor characters (including forcible showing of one such character's undergarments), assault via food on underage character, enslavement of dozens, if not hundreds, of minor characters...


So? Who wants to add more warnings?
heidi: (Default)
Lori (of PoU fame) just told me about interesting "fanfic" - for Hamlet and Macbeth.

The Hamlet one is located here, and is written in iambic pentameter, of course, and features the cast of Scooby Doo thus:
The villain stands confessed. Now let us go.
For much remains to us to be discussed.
And suitable reward must needs be found
For these, our young detectives and their hound.

And the Disney version of Macbeth is .... erp! we can't find it! Does anyone have it? Please point me to it! That Birnam Wood dance routine is too imaginable to miss!
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